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Table 1 Clinical and radiological comparison of intrapulmonary teratoma, hydatid cyst of lung, and lung abscess

From: Intrapulmonary mature cystic teratoma of the lung: case report of a rare entity

  Radiography Signs and Symptoms Involvement Features
Intrapulmonary Teratoma • Typically cystic masses often with focal calcification and peripheral translucency
• Air fluid level is suggestive of bronchial communication if present [9, 19]
• Chest pain
• Hemoptysis
• Cough
• Trichoptysis (most specific) [19]
• Location: left upper lobe [9]
• Unilateral [19]
Hydatid cyst • Typically, a well-defined homogenous radio-opacity
• Air fluid level in case of a complicated cyst [20]
• Usually asymptomatic for many years
• Chest pain
• Dyspnea
• Dry cough
• Hemoptysis [20]
• Location: lower lobes specially the right basal lobe
• Bilateral in 20% of the cases [20]
Acute Lung abscess
(less than 6 week)
• Usually circumscribed with not so well-defined surrounding to lung parenchyma
• Air fluid level mostly present [21]
• Productive Cough
• Fever
• Night sweats [21]
• Location: posterior segments of the upper lobes and the superior segments of the lower lobes (if caused by aspiration) [21]
• Usually unilateral [22]
Chronic lung abscess • Usually irregular star-like shape with well-defined surrounding to lung parenchyma
• Air fluid level mostly present [21]
• Productive Cough
• Fever
• Night sweats
• Weight loss [21]
• Location: posterior segments of the upper lobes and the superior segments of the lower lobes (if caused by aspiration) [21]
• Usually unilateral [22]